Borrowers with modified loans falling into trouble

Financial Crisis Posted on

One of the biggest challenges to ending the foreclosure crisis is this: A surprising number of homeowners who get their monthly payments reduced fall behind again within a year.

When borrowers get into financial trouble, lenders have several ways to help. They can offer grace periods, longer repayment schedules, lower interest rates or reduced balances.

But nearly 40 percent of homeowners who had their monthly payments cut by 20 percent or more last year were delinquent again within a year, according to a report Monday from the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and the Office of Thrift Supervision.

With the economy still weak and employers continuing to cut jobs, "even if you've gone through a modification, your situation may deteriorate," said Fred Phillips-Patrick, director for credit policy at the thrift office.

That's an ominous sign for the Obama administration's plan to stem the foreclosure crisis. Lenders participating in the program have offered trial loan modifications to 760,000 eligible borrowers since it was launched in March. As of last month, just 31,000 of them had been made permanent, which requires at least three on-time payments and proof of income. Nearly the same number had dropped out of the program or were found to be ineligible.

The meager success rate means the $75 billion program may bring little relief to struggling homeowners. A record 14 percent of homeowners with a mortgage are either behind on their payments or in foreclosure. And that affects many more homeowners because deeply discounted foreclosures are hurting property values in many parts of the country, especially Arizona, California, Florida and Nevada.

Legal News Media

Legal News is the top headline legal news provider for lawyers and legalprofessionals. Read law articles and breaking news from law firm's across the United States to get the latest updates. We reserve the right, at our discretion, to change, modify, add, or remove portions of the site at any time. Your This site is solely for your personal use. You are, of course, welcome to print or otherwise copy material from this site for your personal use. However, you may not distribute, exchange, modify, sell or transmit anything you copy from this Site, including but not limited to any text, images, audio and video, for any business, commercial or public purpose. Any unauthorized use of the text, images, audio and video may violate copyright laws, trademark laws, the laws of privacy and publicity and civil and criminal statutes.

 

American Bar Association – Start and Run a Law Firm

NewYorkStateBar.com – Starting a Law Firm

Lawyer Website Designs